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 Topic: Qur'anic studies today

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  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #11010 - November 30, 2023, 10:39 PM

    Quote from: Altara
    Gallez?

    You can always add to the list...

    https://www.reddit.com/r/AcademicQuran/wiki/index/academics/
    Quote
    If you notice any names of academics in Islamic studies not mentioned in the list, please send them to me, and I will have it added to the data file and the list on our community Wiki. You can message me directly or comment the name on this page.
    Also let me know if I missed any Twitter and blog/website!

  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #11011 - November 30, 2023, 11:14 PM

    Jonathan Brockopp - The Rise of Islam in a Judeo-Christian Context

    https://www.academia.edu/49128097/The_Rise_of_Islam_in_a_Judeo_Christian_Context
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #11012 - November 30, 2023, 11:25 PM

    Jonathan Brockopp - Islamic Origins and Incidental Normativity

    https://www.academia.edu/40099586/_Islamic_Origins_and_Incidental_Normativity_2016
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #11013 - December 02, 2023, 09:05 PM


    I'm not a subscriber...
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #11014 - December 08, 2023, 08:45 AM

    Adam Silverstein - Samaritans and Early Islamic Ideas

    https://www.academia.edu/100678895/Samaritans_and_Early_Islamic_Ideas
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #11015 - December 11, 2023, 03:59 PM

    Ilkka Lindstedt - The Qurʾān and the Putative pre-Islamic Practice of Female Infanticide

    https://www.degruyter.com/document/doi/10.1515/jiqsa-2023-0005/html
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #11016 - December 21, 2023, 09:56 AM

    Abstract for an article by Michael Pregill

    From the Mishnah to Muḥammad: Jewish Traditions of Late Antiquity and the Composition of the Qur’an

    https://online.ucpress.edu/SLA/article-abstract/7/4/516/197737/From-the-Mishnah-to-Mu-ammadJewish-Traditions-of?redirectedFrom=fulltext
    Quote
    The copious amount of what appear to be biblical borrowings in the Qur’an has long sparked scholars’ interest in the social and religious background to formative Islam in Late Antiquity. Conventionally, this phenomenon has mainly been explained through claims of direct influence on the Prophet Muḥammad by Arabian Jews who acted as conduits of rabbinic or other types of Jewish lore—claims seemingly confirmed by numerous examples of the Qur’an’s direct address to Jews, “Israelites,” or “People of Scripture” more generally. Progress in illuminating the Jewish context of Islam in the formative period has been hampered in recent decades by two problems: a dearth of evidence corroborating the traditional sources on the Arabian Jewish community in Muḥammad’s time and a general uncertainty regarding Muḥammad’s role as the putative source of the Qur’an (or even his basic historicity). Most scholars now reject a simplistic conception of Jewish influence on Muḥammad as author of the Qur’an, but consensus on a convincing alternative model of qur’anic origins has been elusive. Here, I will evaluate a number of approaches to the authorship of the Qur’an as well as to different types of biblical-Judaic materials adapted and reinterpreted therein. I will argue that the Qur’an not only engages a variety of scriptural and parascriptural precursors from Late Antiquity—Christian as well as Jewish—but reshapes and repurposes them in diverse, even incommensurate, ways. I conclude that no single model of qur’anic reception of such precursors is adequate to account for the diversity of its modes of engagement with its late antique intertexts and suggest that a source-critical approach rooted in a concept of prophetic editorial activity is perhaps the most plausible way to conceptualize this diversity, at least provisionally.

  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #11017 - December 21, 2023, 04:05 PM

    Judaism enters the habitable Peninsula, i.e., Yemen, c. 320.
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #11018 - December 29, 2023, 08:30 AM

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rg61JQgusys
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #11019 - December 30, 2023, 07:59 AM

    Ahmad Al-Jallad - Jesus in Arabia: Tracing the Spread of Christianity into the Desert

    https://www.academia.edu/112435540/Al_Jallad_2022_Jesus_in_Arabia_Tracing_the_Spread_of_Christianity_into_the_Desert
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #11020 - January 02, 2024, 05:01 PM

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NwGwbwFvhHw
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #11021 - January 15, 2024, 07:42 PM

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k2IWyfm3510
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #11022 - January 20, 2024, 03:12 PM


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W2coX7vh2Ks
    Quote
    In this episode of the Real Talk Podcast with Terron and Roxanna, we discuss with Dr. Tommaso Tesei the contents of his latest monograph on the Neṣḥānā d-Aleksandrōs, titled "The Syriac Legend of Alexander's Gate: Apocalypticism at the Crossroads of Byzantium and Iran." Dr. Tesei's work introduces a fresh perspective on overlooked aspects of Byzantine-Persian political debates. By bringing these marginalized debates to the forefront and reevaluating them, he suggests a potential earlier origin for the Syriac Legend, thus challenging commonly held assumptions and offering a recontextualized understanding of its political influences.

    During the podcast, we will also explore the development of themes and motifs found in other Imitatio Alexandri works that would eventually become a part of the Neṣḥānā. Furthermore, Dr. Tesei will enlighten us on the unique ways in which the author of the Neṣḥānā used certain themes and motifs not found in similar works, giving it a distinct character.

    In the last part of the podcast, we'll discuss the Syriac Legend of Alexander in relation to the Dhul Qarnayn pericope found in chapter 18 of the Holy Qur'an.

  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #11023 - January 22, 2024, 03:23 PM

    Podcast: https://web.international.ucla.edu/cnes/article/135578

    Patricia Crone - The Pagan Arabs as Godfearers
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #11024 - January 23, 2024, 08:08 AM

    Podcast: https://www.international.ucla.edu/cnes/article/164625

    Michael Cook - Was the Rise of Islam a Black Swan Event?
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #11025 - April 18, 2024, 06:44 PM

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BGzvqGGISV0 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JxQEVaBM04o

  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #11026 - April 18, 2024, 07:11 PM

    Reddit AMA with Nicolai Sinai

    https://www.reddit.com/r/AcademicQuran/comments/1bpwrn5/ama_with_nicolai_sinai_professor_of_islamic/
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #11027 - April 19, 2024, 02:45 PM

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cjNODB0_9I4
    Al-Jallad and Sidky - A Paleo-Arabic Inscription of a Companion of Muhammad?

    https://www.academia.edu/117704902/Al_Jallad_and_Sidky_2024_A_Paleo_Arabic_Inscription_of_a_Companion_of_Muhammad
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #11028 - April 19, 2024, 08:44 PM

    The inscription is located in taif, not in mekka. it seems they dismiss the point.
    if the inscription was left nearby a shrine, it means the shrine was a sort of monotheistic shrine (they call it a mosque)
    taif is a documented location, so it is not a suprise fining inscriptions there
    it is purely monotheistic and is differentiated from the north west arabian ones in the way they invoke the monotheistic god

    the hima inscription is dated with the northern, bosra dating system, meaning that those who made it were not locals, but travellers
    this inscription in taif has no dating. Of course is pre-islamic as it does not show any evidence of a islamic formulas, rather the opposite, later islamic invokations show to have drawn from this phraseology

    the name in the second half is abd al uzza. Is this really suggesting a connection with paganism?
    as there is no dating it is impossible to say if this abd uzza was really a pagan and when and where

    they are confident the inscription is evidence of the use of this arabic in the area and that the quanic text was composed there
    this makes no sense as the quranic text is heavily engaging with chrisitan literature and this inscription as well (like any other in the area) do show any christian presence

    i did not understand well the argument of al jallad reagarding the way allah is invoked by christians (where we know the inscriptions are actually indisputable christians) but it seems that this specific invcation is not Christian

    al jallad seems to be right that the arabic is derived from a scribal environment and that there is a clear pattern showing that this form of arabic is spreading all over and is replacing the previous one

    if the arabic requires a scribal education, do we have evidence of scribal centers in the area of taif?
    production of texts, writings?
    I have nothing supporting this
    it seems more probable that these people were travellers


    al jallad seems to be confident that syriac had no influence on the formation of arabic and that it is 100% only derived from natabtean
    it does not seem that all scholars agree with this as he says (murad)

    I am not entering the discussion about the association with companions, indeed reynolds does not seem convinced by this
    reynolds raised some critical questions which al jallad seems to be dismissing quickly

    where is this arabic coming from? where do we have the scribal centers producing it and with enough power to impose is onto the other arabics?
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #11029 - April 21, 2024, 01:56 PM

    Only 5 pages of the article. Lazy to see the video...

    Quote
    The inscription is located in taif, not in mekka. it seems they dismiss the point.

    Ofc.

    Quote
    it is purely monotheistic and is differentiated from the north west arabian ones in the way they invoke the monotheistic god

    Inscription 1:
    No 'Mecca', no 'Muhammad' no 'Ka'ba'.

    Quote
    if the inscription was left nearby a shrine, it means the shrine was a sort of monotheistic shrine

    Yes.
    Quote
    Figure 3—p.5.


    One remarks that Iraq  where Arabs were numerous (vassals of the Persians, etc.) is (totally) empty of inscriptions because lacking of exploration and layers of heavily populated constructions. For me... it is a real issue in the discipline (among others...)

    Quote
    the hima inscription is dated with the northern, bosra dating system, meaning that those who made it were not locals, but travellers

    Ofc.
    Quote
    Of course is pre-islamic as it does not show any evidence of a islamic formulas, rather the opposite, later islamic invokations show to have drawn from this phraseology

    Id.

    Quote
    they are confident the inscription is evidence of the use of this arabic in the area and that the quanic text was composed there this makes no sense as the quranic text is heavily engaging with chrisitan literature and this inscription as well (like any other in the area) do show any christian presence


     Unfortunately the truth is that language can be used everywhere, by foreign people, etc. The place attest of nothing .


    Quote
    if the arabic requires a scribal education, do we have evidence of scribal centers in the area of taif?
    production of texts, writings?

    Nope.
    Quote
    it seems more probable that these people were travellers


    Yes, all inscriptions apart Sabaic Yemen the sole sedentary people are nomads/voyagers.

    Quote
    al jallad seems to be confident that syriac had no influence on the formation of arabic and that it is 100% only derived from natabtean it does not seem that all scholars agree with this as he says (murad)


    Briquel-Chatonnet is not agree on that point.


    Quote
    I am not entering the discussion about the association with companions, indeed reynolds does not seem convinced by this reynolds raised some critical questions which al jallad seems to be dismissing quickly.


    Jallad dismiss what is embarrassing him...


    Quote
    where is this arabic coming from? where do we have the scribal centers producing it and with enough power to impose is onto the other arabics?


    (For me...) it is a language with some idiosyncrasies like the  dozens others arabic languages . It is (surtout) an artificial literary language which have never been spoken by anyone.
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #11030 - April 23, 2024, 06:50 AM

    thanks Altara

    in the video al jallad makes an argument about how christianized arabs spelled the word allah in comparison to other arab groups and he provided geographical references to where you find these differences
    our inscription in taif uses the word rabb
    i did not follow very well his argument here (if he was making any)
    the way this inscription in taif calls God rab and the phraseology does not seem to be christian, rather than monotheisitc

    i think he was trying to use this as an argument supporting his view that the islamic tradition provides a report about the alleged author of the inscription as a monk or hanif

    in his arguments he also says that the second part of the inscription calls for a abd uzza (servant of uzza) which as well denotes for him
    - pagan origin of the writer
    - his conversion to monotheism
    - that islamic sources mention a man who converted into islma but was "stubborn" and did not want to change his name
    - he uses this connected to show that there was a "pagan reservuar"
    - the islamic sources depict taif as a place where mekkans had their "holiday place" as taif was higher, green a viable for agriculture

    now
    we have evidence in taif, and not in mekka. Mekkans bother to leave a piety inscription in taif and not in mekka
    the shrina is in taif and not in mekka
    if the mekka sanctuary was so important, then why we find the inscriptions in taif and not in mekka where the man was supposed to live

    does the name abd uzza really possibly denote a pagan origin?
    or it is way possible that people kept tradition names even if they had no pagan connection?
    as uzza was depicted all over arabia, this man could be from anywhere
    if there is a pagan resrvuar, we should anyway find a high concentration of pagan inscriptions in the area which is not the case
    and if these people were converting to a monotheism, why al jallad is not investigating why this is happening, who is driving this and how widespread is this if these inscriptions are NOT christian?


    changing topic
    i understand your argument about a crafted language which is a similar case to cyrillic in eastern europe
    it seems that people are being educated in this language in a scribal place and this language has been studied to address specific people which are travelling (al jallad has noted this pattern)
    as you say there is no way to investigate inscriptions in iraq (so far)
    what would be possible other indicators of the origin of this language
    al jallad is convinced that arabic only evolved from nabatean
    which is possible for the different forms of arabics he investigated
    indeed if there is a language which is crafted for a scope, there must be markers indicating that this language did not "evolve" but popped up from a scribal center
    and morover as we see from the quiraat and ashruf that later arabs did not understand it properly, it means that this language somehow went lost

    last question
    as you are suggesting the quranic arabic had its own form, then it means your book will be composed by a historical critical analyses of the verses with their explanation in context
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #11031 - May 10, 2024, 04:51 PM

    Historical problems with the Bible and Quran | Bart Ehrman and Javad Hashmi
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Hz8jIYr7Z8
    Discussed on reddit here: https://www.reddit.com/r/AcademicQuran/comments/1ck3mjq/weekly_open_discussion_thread/
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #11032 - May 17, 2024, 09:44 AM

    Reddit AMA with Hythem Sidky

    https://www.reddit.com/r/AcademicQuran/comments/1cu21qs/ama_with_hythem_sidky_executive_director_of_the/
    Quote
    Hello r/AcademicQuran! I am Hythem Sidky, Executive Director of the International Qurʾanic Studies Association (IQSA). My research interests are primarily the oral and written transmission of the Quran and pre-Islamic Arabia. I try to bring together textual and mathematical analysis in my work because I think there's a lot to be learned by approaching many questions in Islamic studies in a quantitative manner, where possible. I am slow to write, but I have worked on early quranic manuscripts, the reading traditions, paleo-Arabic & early Islamic inscriptions, radiocarbon dating of quranic manuscripts, and stylometric analysis of the Quran. You can find most of my published work here: https://chicago.academia.edu/HythemSidky

  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #11033 - May 18, 2024, 06:46 AM

    Nicolai Sinai - The Christian Elephant in the Meccan Room: Dye, Tesei, and Shoemaker on the Date of the Qurʾān

    https://www.degruyter.com/document/doi/10.1515/jiqsa-2023-0013/html
    Quote
    A great number of qurʾānic passages exhibit demonstrable intersections with Christian traditions, and sometimes the Qurʾān even addresses Christians directly. Guillaume Dye, Tommaso Tesei, and Stephen Shoemaker have recently argued that this is difficult to reconcile with our current lack of evidence for organized Christian communities in the pre-Islamic Ḥijāz. Accordingly, all three scholars maintain that much of the Qurʾān ought to be decoupled from the preaching of Muḥammad (whose historical existence they do not deny). While recognizing the pertinence of the explanatory challenge identified by Dye, Tesei, and Shoemaker, this article suggests that the problem may be somewhat less acute than it is made out to be. The article then proceeds to a critical examination of the alternative scenario for the genesis of the Qurʾān that is offered, in different variations, by Dye, Tesei, and Shoemaker. This scenario is found to give rise to a number of explanatory difficulties of its own that have not so far been satisfactorily addressed. By way of an appendix, the article includes an extended critique of Shoemaker and Dye’s claim that the Jesus-and-Mary pericope in Sūrah 19 most likely reflects a post-conquest Palestinian milieu.

  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #11034 - May 18, 2024, 07:04 AM

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=afJtVKmgpf4
    Quote
    In this episode of the Real Talk Podcast, we're thrilled to welcome Dr. Imar Koutchoukali to discuss aspects of his dissertation on South Arabia in Late Antiquity. Dr. Koutchoukali's research focuses on linguistic and socio-political transformations during this period, exploring key historical events that may have sparked significant changes in the region during the early Islamic era. We'll examine pivotal events such as the rise of the Himyarites to power, the persecution of Christians in Najran by the Jewish Himyarite ruler Yusuf Dhu Nuwas during his revolt against alleged Aksumite wardship, and Abraha's expedition into central Arabia.

    Furthermore, we'll analyse how epigraphic material aligns with or diverges from literary accounts of South Arabian history, providing valuable insights into the region's past. If you're fascinated by South Arabia during late Antiquity, then this episode of the Real Talk Podcast with Terron & Roxanna, featuring Dr. Imar Koutchoukali, promises to be an enlightening discussion. Make sure to check out Dr. Koutchoukali's dissertation 'Our ʿirbīt is not like your ʿarabiyya' for an in-depth exploration of these topics: https://www.academia.edu/111936859/Koutchoukali_I_2023_diss_Linguistic_and_socio_political_change_in_late_antique_South_Arabia

  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #11035 - May 31, 2024, 10:32 PM

    Ilkka Lindstedt - The religious groups of Mecca and Medina in the sixth–seventh centuries CE

    https://www.academia.edu/119623397/The_religious_groups_of_Mecca_and_Medina_in_the_sixth_seventh_centuries_CE
    Quote
    In this article, I present Mecca and Medina as multi-religious towns in the pre-Islamic and early Islamic period (the sixth–seventh centuries CE). Mecca was a very small town, but the Kaaba shrine there served as a regional pilgrimage site that drew people from different faith communities. Medina was a larger settlement with a significant Jewish population. Jews, Christians and others (“pagans”) lived in both cities. Some of the non-Jewish and non-Christian population had also adopted some of the basic idea of monotheism, although they had not actually converted to Judaism or Christianity. The sources used in the article are, in particular, material remains, the Quran, and Arabic poetry. Recent research based on these sources has changed previous scholarly reconstructions of Mecca, Medina, and the Arabian Peninsula more broadly. According to the conventional narrative, the career of the Prophet Muhammad (circa 610–632 CE) led to the rapid spread of Islam in these cities and the expulsion or forced conversion of non-Muslims, but this does not seem to be true based on the evidence.

  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #11036 - June 01, 2024, 07:35 PM

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ai4luc5hZK4
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #11037 - Yesterday at 07:48 AM

    Interview with Peter von Sivers
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mmBnXD8tAWM
    *not posted as an endorsement of the Islamic Origins youtube channel*
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #11038 - Yesterday at 08:01 AM

    Peter von Sivers - The "Arabian Heresy": A Neglected Source for Understanding the Resurrection in Islam

    https://www.academia.edu/117163912/The_Arabian_Heresy_A_Neglected_Source_for_Understanding_the_Resurrection_in_Islam
  • Qur'anic studies today
     Reply #11039 - Yesterday at 10:07 PM

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ns7HTkFi1zU
    Quote
    In this video I give a short presentation on different proposals for a Syriac background for a number of Qur'anic stories. I look at the influence that the Syriac Alexander Legend, the Sleepers of Ephesus, as well as other Syriac literature have had on the Qur'an. I also evaluate some of the more controversial proposals for Syriac subtext like that of Christoph Luxenberg who argued that much of the Qur'an can be read as a Syriac text.

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